Archive | January 2017

2016 in music

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Here’s the list of 2016 albums that I’ve enjoyed the most – in no particular order.

Spring King – Tell Me If You Like To
LVL UP – Return to love
Parquet Courts – Human Performance
Full of Hell / the Body – One Day You Will Ache Like I Ache
Savak – Best of Luck in Future Endeavors
Repetitor – Gde ćeš
Martha – Blisters in the Pit of My Heart
Nothing – Tired of Tomorrow
Death Grips – Bottomless Pit
Car Seat Headrest – Teens of Denial
Ryley Walker – Golden Sings That Have Been Sung
Viva Belgrado – Ulises
Kikagaku Moyo – House in the Tall Grass
Yung – A Youthful Dream
AJJ – The Bible 2
White Lung – Paradise
Creative Adult – Fear of Life
Self Defense Family – Colicky
G.L.O.S.S. – Trans Day of Revenge
Pfarmers – Our Puram
King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard -Nonagon Infinity
Woods – City Sun Eater In The River Of Light
Massive Attack – Ritual Spirit
Oathbreaker – Rheia
Fat White Family – Songs for Our Mothers
ABOP – ABOP
Uranium Club – Human Exploration
Descendents – Hypercaffium Spazzinate
Cass McCombs – Mangy Love
Gouge Away – , Dies
Culture Abuse – Peach
Sculpture Club – A Place to Stand
Preoccupations – Preoccupations

Youtube playlist for “Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty”

Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty” is a book by Ben Ratliff (New York Times music critic) where he is focusing on listening music in digital era we are part of. In 20 chapters, he drives you through different musical traits like repetition, slowness, speed, quietness, virtuosity etc.

What I like the most in this book, is the way he is making connections between artists in completely different genre. For example, even though the term “blast beat” was coined in the 80s and it became known after hardcore punk and grindcore bands started to use it – in his book, Ben mentions a jazz song “Salt Peanuts” by Bud Powell, which was recorded in the 1953, and references to a part of the song where “blast beat” was used for the first time, than compares it with D.R.I. song “Draft me“. And there are just many more connections that most of us probably just never thought about.

What I did here – I made a playlist of songs that were mentioned in the book. Well, at least most of the songs – because some I couldn’t have found and for some I just picked one song from the album that was mentioned. Songs are sorted in the order of appearance, but are not clustered in chapters.

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